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Global smartphone shipments to double in four years

08 июня 2010

Global smartphone shipments will likely more than double in the next four years, signaling dramatic potential growth for market leaders such as Apple Inc's iPhone, according to data expected to be released by market tracker iSuppli Corp. early next week.

In a report scheduled for release on Monday, the research firm forecast that smartphone shipments will rise 105% to 506 million units in 2014 from 246.9 million in 2010.

ISuppli also said smartphones have become the fastest-growing segment of the cellphone market with unit shipment growth of 35.5% expected in 2010. Overall mobile handsets are expected to grow 11.3%.

"Because of this, companies that are exclusively focused on this area, like Apple, have managed to move up to near the top tier of the global cellphone business," Tina Teng, an iSuppli analyst said in a statement. "This shows that the smartphone is reshaping the competitive landscape of the wireless business."

The information comes as computing rapidly moves to handheld devices with companies such as Google Inc , Microsoft Corp, Research In Motion Ltd. and Apple vying for dominance. In April, the maker of Macintosh computers released its iPad tablet computer to rapid sales and other companies are expected to release competing products by the year's end.

On Monday, Apple is widely expected to unveil its next generation iPhone, a move that will likely further solidify its position in the smartphone market.

In the first quarter, Apple shipped 8.8 million iPhones, giving it about 3% of the overall cellphone market, according to the data tracker. Apple ranked No. 6 in the global cellphone market in the first quarter, iSuppli said.

Источник: Total Telecom

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